Mind Your Email Manners

by Moe Arora on September 21, 2009

One of my biggest annoyances is receiving mass emails with my email address exposed in the TO or CC field; along with 500 other unsuspecting recipients. It breeds unwanted solicitation and spam, as well as encouraging others to dismiss netiquette.

If you need to send mass emails, please look into email marketing solutions and mailing list software. If you don’t want to pay for a mailing list service, and instead choose to simply use your regular email account, then please remember to use the BCC function.


If you’re unfamiliar with the BCC function in email, it stands for blind carbon copy. That means, when you place an email address in this field, the recipient will still receive your email, but their email address will not be exposed.

How To Properly Send Mass Email

When sending mass email, you should enter ALL email addresses in the BCC field so that you don’t expose your contacts’ email addresses to others.

It’s just simple email manners, and your contacts will appreciate it.

I’m developing an almost zero-tolerance for non-BCC’d emails; regardless of whether if the sender is a friend/contact or not. I decided to post this as a reference point to direct all the non-BCC’ers out there.

Another point worth mentioning…

Another major email faux-pas is emailing the wrong address. If you are emailing a blogger, please check to see if they have a separate email account for music submissions or press.

Some of us have certain methods of managing our email, and by ignoring our request, you are making it difficult for us to pay attention to whatever it is that you are sending.

In my case, I ask that people only send direct communication involving business to my work email account. All other non-direct, non-work email should be sent to my blog email address.

I will often email people to remind them of my request, if they send it to the wrong address. If they continue to ignore it, I simply mark their email address as spam, causing their emails to be directed to my spam folder (which I never check) and eventually deleted. And it doesn’t matter who it is – I do this with friends too. (I’m ruthless, huh?)

If someone can’t respect my simple request, then they don’t need access to me anyhow.

So when I ask someone to email me at my blog email address; I am not dismissing their email – I’m simply asking that you send it to the account that I will check on my computer, when I have the time to go through it, and watch/listen to the media that you’re sending me.

The main point is, when someone gives you their email address, they are giving you access to communicate with them. When you abuse it, you’re showing them that you do not appreciate that access – therefore not appreciating them.

No disrespect to those of you whom I, or someone else, have directed to this post – we’re just asking for some common courtesy.

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