Tag Archives: management

Talking With The Trafficker Management

producersweek

Producer Manager, E, of The Trafficker Management

Producer Manager, E, of The Trafficker Management

Can you introduce yourself a bit and tell us what it is that you do and who you represent?

I go by the name of E.  I own and run The Trafficker Management.

We manage several producers, most notably: MegaMan, Tommy Gunnz and Boi-1Da. We also manage one rapper, Richie Sosa.

What’s the big difference for you as a manager, representing producers vs representing artists?

I would say managing an artist is a bigger challenge then managing producers.

The reason I say that is; with an artist there are more politics involved. It’s a lot more work and it takes a lot of patience. When handling artists you are not just selling a sonic product but a visual one as well.

Remember, an artist’s career is a lot more complicated than that of a producer. With producers, if they are talented then their beats can be sold.

My theory, is a great record will always find a home, no matter if it is a unknown producer from England or Timbaland. But don’t get me wrong, I do believe producers have a certain image to uphold. I also believe they should be out and about making sure people put a face to their beats.

Continue reading

Talking With Producer Manager Zach Katz (Part 2)

producersweek

zackkatz

This is the second half of a 2-part interview with Zach Katz. To read Part 1, please click here.

Do you focus more on placing J.R Rotem’s music with artists or are you more focused on placing music with film, television and video games?

We do both, but I primarily focus on placing his music with artists.

We have an incredible publisher that helps us, Sony/ATV. That’s one of the reasons to do a publishing deal – to add more people to your team. They have a full film, television & video game department, who I provide music to on a regular basis, and their job is to go out there and to secure placements.

So I don’t do it all alone; I have people on the team who can also help.

But that income is definitely valuable, and the name of the game – especially in this shrinking market – is to capitalize and bring in as many revenue sources as possible.

One issue many upcoming producers have is knowing when to do free production for an artist and when to start charging. Also, once they do charge, how much to charge. How do you recommend they approach that issue?

Continue reading